Writing

The Trail of Trust

I’m not super competitive. I played soccer for about eight years and stopped after my Freshman year of High School. I was kind of bored with my rec team; I wasn’t really progressing so I decided to opt out. Because really, I only had one other option if I didn’t want a select or a school team: find another rec team. It was fun while it last. I mean, you’re talking to a girl who couldn’t run the mile in under ten minutes during P.E. class. (I have since then improved and run a 6 minute mile with my sister impromptu).

I enjoy bragging about my brother and sister. (OK well, ALL of my siblings). They are fourteen. The two of them started doing cross-country. They’re amazing.  At their first meet, my sister came in first for her school and fifth OVERALL. for girls. My brother was around seventh for his school and I forgot his overall placement. There were a lot more boys than girls– I noticed this almost immediately. Anyways, they run just to run. I only ran when I played soccer, because for me,  the goal was more  tangible. More than just getting a PR. The ball was within sight. Props to these kids they went uphill, downhill and around in circles. The away school didn’t catch the lay of the land until their first meet. They had no idea what they were up against. Except that this could easily be their biggest competition. But they knew very little about the individual runners.

In life, I’ve found that some goals we absolutely must pursue are not always clear. In order to reach it we are taken down a trail which leads into a thick cloud of fog. We must run without knowing exactly where we are going. I call this the Trail of Trust. Let me be clear, this is different from the Walk of Recklessness. We are not aimlessly wasting ourselves on tangible things which are calling out from the sides of the path, tempting us to stray from the Trail of Trust.  The Walk of Recklessness is tempting. Why? Because it’s EASY. The path is wide and we can see more clearly where we are headed. The Walk of Recklessness is a means to an end. Eternal goals are different. God is infinite. His plans are boundless. They are beautiful. Far more detailed and intricate than anything else we could ever dream up. It’s the real deal. Satan loves it when we settle. He loves it when we settle for less.

Those who walk down the Trial of Trust are like Irene, from George MacDonald’s children’s book, The Princess and the Goblin. In the story, Irene’s godmother presents her with a gift. “A ring with a thread tied to it, leading to a little ball of thread.” Irene’s fairy godmother goes on to explain that she will keep the ball of thread and Irene, the ring. Irene is confused. But I can’t see the thread. Her fairy godmother answers  “No. The thread is too fine for you to see it. You can only feel it.” The story goes on to tell the story of how when Irene finds the goblins at her house, she feels for the thread. Although she cannot see, she can feel the thread and it leads her to safety. That is faith.  Faith and trust go hand in hand. Like chocolate and peanut butter.

Be careful when running. The Trail of Trust is not easy, but it’s worth the plunge, it will be rocky, steep, slippery, and narrow. You may not know where you are going or even how to get there. Take hold of that thread. It acts as your compass. There is only one catch about the thread. If you only pretend to believe in it, it will not aid you. You’ve gotta go all in. Do or die. Don’t let recklessness distract you.  Don’t get caught up in what everyone else is doing. That will destroy you. Trust in

There are periods of time in our lives where we must take a leap of faith and run. We must trust in Christ’s presence and keep on. With faith we can move mountains. With faith we possess the ability to go places! Our final destination may not be where we expected, but it’s certainly where we are supposed to be.

~Blessings~

Don’t be afraid of the fog! It’s where we learn valuable lessons in some of life’s most unclear circumstances.

Kayla

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